Trying Black Out Poetry

I tried black out poetry, which I had never tried before! Besides getting maybe a little high from the Sharpee fumes, it was fun and challenging. I had to really find a page that would need to be a black out poem and therefore themes that would have to do with space in this way. So I found this book called Future Shock, totally free, and paged through. I did find one that had the word horizon in all caps and decided to use the horizon as an image that uses light and receding light. I only realized this after I saw the words “nearby city” and then decided to think about a scene with both a horizon and a city and how the two exchange light in a way as night falls. Here is my poem! If you don’t get any of these themes from it I don’t blame you. I do recommend trying the black out poem though! I tried another one but the image wouldn’t load correctly. HOrizon black out poem

 

 

2 Replies to “Trying Black Out Poetry”

  1. Gabi,
    This poem is really gorgeous, and while I want to try out something similar, I’m totally terrified of defacing a book I’ve spent good money on! Maybe I can dig through and destroy a book from Humanities to experiment with (I’m looking at you Lytton), but I’m also interested in the morality of altering someone else’s text to create a new one in your words. I think it could be cool to play with the words of old white dudes and maybe pull something out of them that we haven’t seen before.

  2. Nicole that sounds really interesting! Like the idea of “defacing.” Hmm that could be a collection. Something I found really interesting while blacking out my poem was that the page obviously had an agenda and a goal and that by rewording the page I was disrupting that. Like this guy wrote this book in the 80s about the “shock” of change to come and how to survive it. So that was like a whole layer for me as a writer to think about how this man was afraid of the coming change and I was blocking out his words from the future. So yeah it creates a completely different poem in the poet’s eyes I think.

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